68 search results for: "Science Break"

Science Break : Electrical & EM Methods

Science Break articles. On circadian rhythms (December 2013 RECORDER) I read about a company which offers a clock that, “monitors sleep patterns… and uses coloured lights customized to your circadian rhythms to facilitate sleep, and to wake you at an optimal time.” (National Post, 2014) To find out more, Google…

Science Break | May 2014

Science Break : Cogeneration

Science Break articles, something I really enjoy. On the topic of war, encryption and crosswords, Jim Laing drew my attention to a WWII story involving a Surrey, England headmaster who was a regular crossword author. English intelligence noticed a suspiciously high number of their “secret” code words were showing up…

Science Break | May 2013

Science Break : Bacteriophages

Science Break article “Parasitoids” (Kuhn, 2008). There I contrasted parasites, which do not kill their hosts, with parasitoids, which do. Lysogenic and lytic are analogous terms, albeit at a microscopic scale. Figure 2.  Anatomy and infection cycle of phage T4, used under Creative Commons license 4.0 (Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., 2017)…

Science Break | September 2019

Science Break : Savage or Slave?

Science Break articles are glorified book reviews, and this one falls into that category. Against the Grain: A Deep History of the Earliest States, by James Scott (2017) really impressed and surprised me as each chapter offered up new revelations and different ways of looking at things, challenging what I…

Science Break | March 2019

Science Break : Hominin Update (Part 2)

Science Break article. In the abbreviated section below on DNA sequencing I draw heavily on Svante Pääbo’s Neanderthal man: in search of lost genomes, a book that I highly recommend to readers who want to pursue this topic further. Pääbo has played a central role in the push to salvage,…

Science Break | June 2018

Science Break : Automatic Transmissions

Science Break article (Kuhn, 2012) on the Antikythera device, an ancient machine that used planetary gears to predict the positions of the known (then) planets in our solar system. In Figure 3, if the carrier (green) is rotated 45° clockwise then the planet gears (blue) turn within the fixed ring…

Science Break | September 2017

Science Break : Metal Leaching

Science Break article on steel. Leaching Leaching, in the general sense, describes the extraction of a substance from a solid by dissolving the solid in a liquid. When a solvent is added to the solid (made up of an insoluble carrier and the desired solute), the solid separates into a…

Science Break | March 2017

Science Break : Morality

Science Break article on heuristics, and morals deal almost entirely with areas lacking complete information. Research has shown that the brain circuitry for heuristics gets shaped and modified through experience and learning, especially during childhood, so this would explain how moral beliefs can be so different from one community to…

Science Break | November 2014

Science Break : Immaculate Conception, Christmas, Etc.

Science Break articles; the challenge will be to find the time! Happy New Year everyone. References alex. (2011, August 1). The Doctor Who Stacked Weights on His Testicles. Retrieved December 12, 2013, from Mad Science Museum: http://www.madsciencemuseum.com/msm/pl/sensitive_testes Anonymous blogger. (2012, February 18). Tusko’s Trip. Retrieved December 12, 2013, from The…

Science Break | January 2014

Science Break : Circadian Rhythms

Science Break article “Plant hydraulics” (Kuhn, 2013), even plants are capable of fairly rapid response to external stimuli, and of course animals are too. But those responses are not circadian; in order to meet the criteria, the system must more or less lock in to a 24 hour clock, and…

Science Break | December 2013

Science Break : Natural Gas Liquids

Science Break article, “Africa’s deadly lakes” concerning heavy gases. (Kuhn, 2009). Normal Butane This is the unbranched form of butane (n-C4H10), where the four carbon atoms are connected in a continuous chain. It has numerous uses – in lighters, camp stoves etc., as a propellant for spray cans, and as…

Science Break | November 2012

Science Break : Weather Maps

Science Break” articles, and that’s great. If you have any ideas for future articles, please pass them on. Alternatively, if you’d like to submit your own article, please contact me. I’d love it if we could run guest articles. My contact info is oliver.kuhn@divestco.com or (403) 298-5639. Chris Irvine contacted…

Science Break | March 2009

Science Break : Opioids

…Several months ago when I was picking this topic, opioids were arguably considered the biggest current health crisis, but of course now that has been eclipsed by COVID-19.  Brian Schulte (RECORDER editor) and I considered switching the topic to COVID-19, but decided against it, since the news is swamped with…

Science Break | July 2020

Science Break : Feral and Invasive Species

…It’s fall, and it’s election season, so there are maple leaves everywhere, real and on placards. Since moving to Toronto I’ve learned to both love and hate maple trees. My back yard is surrounded by them – two huge Norway maples (Acer platanoides) to the west, and although damaged by…

Science Break | February 2020

Science Break : Concrete

…People love coining terms to categorize periods of human culture into distinct Ages. I suppose it’s an exercise in how future societies will view us. The industrial age, the computer age, the hydrocarbon age, the information age…even geologists have got into the game, with the term Anthropocene. I wonder if…

Interview | December 2019

Science Break : The Human Ear

…Compared to our other sensory organs, the human ear has always struck me as odd. We are delivered touch, smell, sight, and taste in such a seamless, integrated way that it’s almost magical. In comparison, the ear seems to be a home handyman job! I can relate to that, and…

Science Break | June 2019

Science Break : Calendars

…Calendars A friend of mine recently put forward the theory that differences in the historical levels of technical sophistication between human cultures are largely a matter of latitude. His thinking is that the further an ancient society lived from the equator, the more affected they were by the changing seasons.…

Science Break | October 2018

Science Break : Hominin Update (Part 1)

…The last few years have seen several significant finds related to human prehistory. There was the 2003 discovery of Homo floresiensis, aka “the hobbit”, a distinct (and extinct) species in the same genus as us, Homo. In 2017, more accurate dating pushed back the date of human arrival to Australia…

Science Break | March 2018

Science Break : Fireworks

…This past summer saw thousands of fireworks displays across Canada as we celebrated 150 years of Confederation. I’m sure few of us really understand how fireworks work, so this article will educate and prepare us for 2067, although if not dead by then I’ll certainly be deaf and blind. The…

Science Break | December 2017

Science Break : Animal Defense Systems

…One evening last summer our dog was in a frenzy – he’d cornered some critter under our deck, most likely a raccoon. However, the flashlight revealed a white, mangy little creature about the size of a cat. Its head, especially the jaw, was large in proportion to its body, and…

Science Break | January 2017